UCCSTC HECATOMB

UCCS DANCE

HECATOMB

hecatomb promo image

Theatre & Dance Major Olivia Langley on Directing Hecatomb 


So, Olivia, what is Hecatomb?: 
Hecatomb is a collection of cycles. These cycles are informed by historical narratives that can be described in the definitions of each disposition. As the dancers attempt to make sense of a liminal world wrought with catastrophe, they encounter past entities of human existence. Each movement displays how instances of anguish and violence, and autonomy and peace, are embedded in human history and nature. Hecatomb is about humanity. It begins in the aftermath of a catastrophic event with no explanation. This lack of explanation leaves the dancers in a space surrounded by relics of humanity. This forces them to reconstruct the world around them while simultaneously attempting to end this cycle.  

Why the show title of Hecatomb, what does it mean?:  
I chose the name Hecatomb because of Merriam Webster's two definitions for it. In that dictionary, Hecatomb is listed as 1. "an ancient Greek and Roman sacrifice of 100 oxen or cattle", and 2. "the sacrifice or slaughter of many victims". I found these definitions to be incredibly interesting in relation to how oppression and injustice saturate our reality. While the ancient sacrifice of cattle holds no true meaning (as a symbol of the past and affiliated with animals), the slaughter of victims is more striking (as it assumes the death of victims, or people). This relates to our reality because it details how we overlook an idea if it seems outdated and unrelated to humanity - but is seemingly urgent once it seems timeless and directly related to humans. Furthermore, while the slaughter of oxen is overlooked, but the slaughter of humans is considered, the cycle of this Hecatomb is inevitable. The name hecatomb can also be translated into "an intense loss of life for some cause", which brings the themes explored in Hecatomb together. 

What inspired this creative endeavor?: 
The inspiration for Hecatomb came from an anime entitled Attack on Titan. The show's creator, Hajime Isayama, wrote the work with the intent of confronting notions of human nature in connection with historical atrocities. In the show, it becomes clear that the oppressor holding the characters captive is none other than humanity itself. I found this idea incredibly interesting and forever current. Themes in Attack on Titan, such as cycles, human nature, and the juxtaposition between violence and peace truly inspired the show. The truth of our history and its apparent cycles fulfilled that inspiration.  

Olivia, tell us a bit more about yourself and what you want to achieve with this work: 
I have danced since I was young, harboring dreams of not only performing dance, but choreographing works of my own. I am the choreographer and director for Hecatomb. I am also a Senior at UCCS studying theatre and dance. I'm hoping to achieve a visceral response from both audience and dancers. I'd like for them to feel as if they are watching a history book in motion, watching the culmination of archives, reliving an old memory, and leading a movement simultaneously. This piece is a reflection - a relic - of humanity. My goal is to create something that will remain with the audience and dancers that can inform the way the perceive history, politics, and the overall integrity of humankind moving forward. 

What have the student learned this semester that is expressed in this dance?: 
The students, and especially the dancers, have learned to navigate a world gone arry due to the pandemic. They have had to overcome the mental, financial, and physical barriers of uncertainty - not knowing whether the work they put into the show would have a chance to be fulfilled before an audience. 

Who all is involved?: We currently have seven dancers, five designers (not including myself), five assistant designers, a technical crew and our stage manager!  

It sounds amazing. Can we see it in person?:  Yes!  We will have safe, socially distanced showings on March 12th - 7:30pm, 13th - 2:00pm + 7:30pm, 14th - 2:00pm, 18th - 7:30pm, 19th - 7:30pm 

General admission tickets are $7.
*UCCS students receive free admission to all UCCS Theatre and Dance productions.
Contact the Box Office with your student ID number handy to receive your complimentary ticket. 

BUY TICKETS

With COVID restrictions in consideration, this performance will be open to a limited audience. For more information about this performance contact Kevin Landis at klandis@uccs.edu.

 

 


Crew:

Director.........................................Olivia Langley
Stage Manager.............................Sarah Chin
Assistant Stage Manager..............Noah Wolbodt
Scenic Designer............................Hunter Buck
Sound Designer............................Juan Carlos Valdes
Assistant Sound Designer.............Erin Joyner
Lighting Designer..........................JoLynn Minns
Assistant Lighting Designer...........Matthew Phillips
Costume Designer.........................Amanda Dixon 
Assistant Costume Designer.........David LaBeaux
Properties Master..........................Delaney Ciborowski 
Assistant Properties Master...........Audrey McGee
Stagehand.....................................Kalie Petroff


Dancers:

Shantel Horne
Serena McNearny
Caleb Hall
Shayla Mellen
Kaela Apuron 
Serenity Johnson
 

 

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS